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Dentallally

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- at 09:59:00 - Dental_Information RSS Feed | Really Simple Syndication

The Information about Dental Vacuum Systems

When was the last time you gave any thought to your vacuum system? Probably not once since it was bought and installed and probably not again until it needs replacement. Do you ever hear your suction(dental suction unit), smell your suction, does it ever produce inadequate force to allow all the practitioners in the practice to operate effectively at the same time? Traditional wet vacuum systems are loud, smelly (both from the burnt oil and the debris that is trapped in the tanks for an extended period of time) and use massive amounts of water, up to 200,000 gallons per year, equal to an Olympic size swimming pool worth of water every month. Not only is this an environmental concern, but a major financial sinkhole as well.

Averaged over North America, the water required to run a wet vacuum system can cost approximately $2,000 per year. This accounts for the incoming costs only; some communities are beginning to legislate what they consider excessive waste water release, taxing effluents. Thus, the dentist with a wet vacuum system is hit with a double water bill, once on the way in, and again on the way out. Since, a dry vacuum system does not require the water that wet systems do, there is a very positive financial impact (in addition to the environmental one) in switching to the newer technology when the old system needs to be replaced.

The recent introduction of various dry vacuum systems eliminates these concerns and provides excellent clinical vacuuming power. The concerns of retro-fitting a new unit center on practicality and cost. The replacement dry system should be no larger than the existing wet one, and should preferably provide more suction capacity for the practice. Other parameters include reduction of noise and the drainage requirements; most wet system traps must be drained on a regular basis, a task usually allotted (due to its popularity) to the staff member with the least seniority.

Both systems work well for dentistry. However, a new wet vac creates up to 15″ Hg suction pressure while a new dry vac (some but not all) creates up to 25″ Hg. This provides the power and performance that the dentist expects from the vacuum system. This is probably the single most important factor to consider when selecting a new vacuum and should be carefully researched. (Some dry vacs produce only 8″ Hg suction pressure.)
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10 Blog Posts 0 Comments 0 Following 0 Followers 52 User RSS Feed abonnieren
cefgho
@cefgho

Dentallally

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