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Dentallally

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- at 08:16:57 - Dental_Information RSS Feed | Really Simple Syndication

Are There Negative Effects of Fast Curing

curing light , material
Fast curing has been accused of putting too much stress on the bond of a restoration to the tooth. If you apply too much light to a restorative material, it will presumably shrink more quickly, opening gaps at the tooth-restoration interface, causing white lines and microleakage. High power has also been accused of inducing cracks in thin porcelain veneers.

Eleven different curing protocols using five different lights and four different restorative materials were investigated as to whether any variables could be isolated to predict the incidence of white lines at the margins and/or microleakage. We found that, while there is a general association between white lines and microleakage, it is not consistent across composite materials and curing protocols. In other words, there are too many other variables to merely conclude that if you eliminate the white lines, you will also eliminate microleakage.

The same 11 different curing protocols and five different lights were used as in the Class I study, but with this project, we used three different flowables on the gingival wall and investigated as to whether any variables could be isolated to predict the incidence of microleakage. We found that neither the dental curing light nor the curing protocol produced any statistically significant differences in microleakage.

Our tests were unable to detect any significant differences in microleakage in Class II restorations from the so-called “low stress” modes, such as step, ramp, or pulse. And, after bulk curing a packable composite in a Class I preparation using two “low stress modes”, one regular mode from a halogen light, and one regular mode from a plasma arc light, we were not able to detect any differences in marginal integrity, stain uptake, enamel crazing, or the infamous “white line” formation at enamel margins, as viewed under a stereomicroscope at 50x.

More power, as measured by a radiometer, presumably means we can cure materials in less time, more deeply, or both. Since no one likes to sit at the chair holding the light for at least 40 seconds per increment, for example, high-powered lights that presumably permit fast curing have generated enthusiastic interest within the profession. In addition, the less time you spend curing a restoration, the more income you can realize.

However, the marketing of power being emitted by curing lights is becoming just as frenzied as the horsepower race in cars or the bond strength wars with adhesives. Unfortunately, unless a light is capable of an extremely high power output, relatively small differences in power output will not significantly increase its true performance. This again is similar to cars, where big boosts in horsepower only allow vehicles to drop their “0-60” times fractions of a second, which may be important on the race track, but has no relevance to everyday driving practices. This also applies to “turbo” tips that may not perform superiorly to conventional tips, despite their higher radiometer readings.
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10 Blog Posts 0 Comments 0 Following 0 Followers 52 User RSS Feed abonnieren
cefgho
@cefgho

Dentallally

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